Rozane Marcia Triches, Associate Professor, Brazil
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

In the southern region of Brazil, where I live (state of Paraná) there is a large production of commodities for export such as soybeans and maize. Essentially, they are produced in conventional food systems and with GMO seeds. Few products for internal consumption are organic. So, where I live, unfortunately, the food system is industrialized with few organic foods.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

Currently, I have been working with sustainable diets. In this theme, I have studied the environmental impact (water, carbon, and ecological footprint) of the food served in university restaurants and school meals (public food procurement). I have also done research aimed at understanding the role of social and professional actors who work in school meals in relation to their knowledge, concerns, and actions in relation to food and sustainability. In this sense, I also conducted research on the purchase of organic products in schools in the state of Paraná, the difficulties in this process, how the municipalities have made these purchases, and the role of social actors in this process. Another work that I have been doing is on the conservation of traditional and native food, enabling biodiversity in traditional populations as remnants of Africans (quilombolas in the state of Paraná) and riverside people (ribeirinhos, in the state of Pará).

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

In 2019, the governor of the state of Paraná (Brazil) signed a decree regulating Law 16.751 / 10, which institutes organic school feeding throughout the state’s educational system in Paraná. The goal is to gradually include organic food in the school feeding from more than 2,000 state schools until reaching 100% of the total in 2030. It is not recent news, but it is very important for a state like Paraná, which, as I said, essentially produces conventional foods.


Dr. agr. Wahyudi David, Assistant Professor, Universitas Barkie, Indonesia
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

In the city where I live (Depok, Indonesia) is relatively closed to organic production. The organic production in the region is still very small in comparison to the conventional production. The agricultural production is dominantly operated by traditional and semi-traditional farmers. The food supply chain already integrated the modern supply chain companies that can distribute the food nationwide. Organic food consumers dominantly live in an urban area (Jakarta and surrounding cities, including  Depok, where I live).

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

I have been working with organic food quality and food culture. In this theme, I have studied the impact of processing on nutritional and food safety. The research has also analysed which type of processing is suitable for human need both nutritional as well as sensory properties. In the recent finding, the dilemma between nutritional and sensory properties is an obstacle, wherein most of the time the nutritional is high and the sensory acceptances is low. In this sense, I have developed an application that can connect producer, processor and consumer and share information about organic production and processing. This application aims to have a better understanding of how and why particular processing influence the nutritional value of the product. Detail project here

3. What would you like to tell blog readers? 🔊

Organic food as defined by consumers is healthier compared to conventional food. However, in a food system processing plays an important role that lead to increasing and decreasing the essential nutrients. By giving the correct information and education, a consumer may have a choice and make their decision not just on sensory ability but also appropriate knowledge about the product. In a system, consumers perceptions and expectations are important to create a sustainable organic food system.


Susanne Bügel, Prof., Deputy Head of Department – education, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

I am living in a rural part of the Southern part of Zealand, just 70 km from the Capital Copenhagen. The Organic share of the total food production in Denmark is 11.3%, however in my commune the organic share is among the lowest with less than 5%. However, I do have my own pesticide free garden with where we are almost self-sufficient with fruits, berries, nuts and vegetables. We buy most meat (organic) directly from farmers or from a box system (Kødbilen – The meat car).

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

The Organic food systems programme (OFSP) and projects related to OFSP. Questions like: What is a sustainable, organic diet? My main interest is related to the intake of minerals and vitamins and how and which diets can provide sufficient amounts of minerals and vitamins for the population.

Ongoing projects:

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

That when it comes to diet, nutrition and health, they have to be critical and not listen to self-appointed experts. That for the diet to be sustainable, we in high-income countries need to cut down on meat, eat more vegetables and throw away less food. Therefore we need to rethink our diets and make the vegetables the main dish and meats the side-dish.


Dr. Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Research director INRAE, Nutritional Epidemiologist, Paris, France
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

I’m a French Researcher and I’m linving in an idnustrialised system. However conversion about organic is increasing rapidly.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

I’m the supervisor of sustainable food system topic in my lab (nutritional epidemiology research team) and I am leading the BioNutriNet project, which aims to collect and describe the consumption of organic food as part of the diet in a large French sample (about 35000 participants). Regarding organic food consumption we also study environmental and health impacts.

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

We recently published a paper in Nature food with the objective to optimized diet with low environmental pressure and high proportion of organic food under nutritional constraints. Please have a look at the abstract : https://www.nature.com/articles/s43016-021-00227-7


Jakob Sehested, Director of ICROFS – International Centre for Research in Organic Food Systems, Denmark
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

The organic sector in Denmark is in a positive and consumer-driven growth. Denmark has the world’s largest organic share of total food sales, and the trend continues to increase. Total organic retail and online sales in Denmark increased by 14% in 2020 and exceeded DKK 16 billions in 2020.

I live in a village in Central Jutland surrounded by farmland. Farm shops and food markets offers good opportunities for purchase of organic food of local, regional and international origin.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

CurrentlyI’m focusing on the national programme ‘Organic Research, Development and Demonstration’ which is coordinated by ICROFS and funded by Danish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries. We have the past years experienced a noticeable increase in the number of applications within a broad area of research, which indicates a growing interest in organic research in Denmark.

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

We must continue to invest in research, development and innovation to further strengthen the contribution of organic agriculture to society within areas such as environment and climate, biodiversity, drinking water protection, animal welfare and health. Denmark is at the forefront internationally in terms of prioritizing research that aims to strengthen sustainable organic agriculture and sustainable food systems and we are experiencing a positive and consumer-driven growth based on sustainability, consumer confidence and innovation. The organic research has contributed to making organic products marketable, secured increase in agricultural productivity and strengthened the sustainability. Without this basis, the market for organic products in Denmark would not be as diversified, competitive and attractive as it is today.  


Rodolphe Vidal, ITAB – Institute of Organic Food and Agriculture, France
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

I am working at national level so organic share is not so high (just above 6%) but with many disparity amid regions. We still have a great job to do to reach 25% organic land and share.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

We are working on core organic project called ProOrg to deliver best practices and assesment framework to organic operators. We are also coordinating a national network dedicated to organic food processing and are trying to set up regional food system programm to relocate and link food producer; processors and consumer at local scale.

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

Organic farming has a big opportunity to achieve climate change mitigation but we have to do it all together and keep the sector with strong values and a step forward.


Sebastian Kretschmer, Department of Organic Food Quality & Food Culture
Faculty of Organic Agricultural Sciences, University of Kassel, Germany
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

I try to buy 100% organic products, but few of them come from a 100 mile radius. As everyobody else I am partaking in the global food system, of which organic is a nested element.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

SDG Drivers in Food Systems (https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsufs.2021.536620/abstract)

The Organic Mindset (https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/13/9/4724)

Food Hubs (https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/13/9/4724)

City Region Food Systems (https://orgprints.org/id/eprint/36201/)

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

The Organic Mindset, much like the Sustainability Mindset, developed by Kassel & Rimanoczy (2018), encompasses “a way of thinking and being that results from a broad understanding of the ecosystem’s manifestations, from social sensitivity, as well as an introspective focus on one’s personal values and higher self, and finds its expression in actions for the greater good of the whole” (Kassel & Rimanoczy, 2018, p. 7), or as the Japanese organic farmer and author Fukuoka (2009, p. 65) puts it “the ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.”


Susanne Braun, Managing Director of the Research Center for Bioeconomy at University of Hohenheim, Germany
  1. What Organic Food System do you live in? 🥦

I live in the German city of Stuttgart. While the city is relatively large with over 600,000 inhabitants and characterized by highly innovative companies such as Daimler, Porsche or Bosch, Stuttgart is also home to 200 farmers who till their soils within the city boundaries. With over 2,500 hectares of fields, vineyards and meadows, Stuttgart puts a lot of effort into helping farmers stay local and foster direct supply chains to meet the needs of the city´s population. While many farms are still run conventionally, the awareness for shifting towards organic agriculture steadily increases on local, as well as on national level.

2. What have you been working on recently? 📚

My team at the Research Center for Bioeconomy and I do our best every day to provide answers and solutions to the big questions facing today’s food system. We do this mainly by engaging ourselves in EU projects dealing with sustainable food production and short food supply chains. Not only are we tackling issues such as fertilizer or pesticide usage but also investigating the acceptance and production of plant-based food alternatives for meat. Yet, those undertakings can only be mastered and solved collectively. Therefore, I am intensively engaged in several networks such as FOODforce, SCAR-AKIS, SUSFOOD2 ERA-net, or as national representative at ISEKI.

A selection of ongoing projects can be found below:

CO-FRESH https://co-fresh.eu/
SMARTCHAIN https://www.smartchain-h2020.eu/
FIELDS https://www.erasmus-fields.eu/home/
BIOCARB-4-FOOD https://www.biocarb4food.eu/

3. What would you like to tell blog-readers? 🔊

I am firmly convinced that a change to organic agriculture can only succeed in the long term if as many different stakeholders as possible participate and collaborate. To this end, the European Commission is increasingly fostering citizen participation, in which many stakeholders can jointly develop concepts and solutions. Perhaps many people do not even know how and where they can get relevant information, or how they can engage themselves in such topics. For more information, I highly recommend a look at our homepage:

https://rc-bioeconomy.uni-hohenheim.de/